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The Perma Book of Ghost Stories W. Bob Holland

The Perma Book of Ghost Stories

W. Bob Holland

Published 1950
ISBN :
Hardcover
188 pages
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 About the Book 

PrefaceThis collection of ghost stories owes its publication to an interest that I have long felt in the supernatural and in the works of imagination. As a child I was deeply concerned in tales of spooks, haunted houses, wraiths and specters. StoriesMorePrefaceThis collection of ghost stories owes its publication to an interest that I have long felt in the supernatural and in the works of imagination. As a child I was deeply concerned in tales of spooks, haunted houses, wraiths and specters. Stories of weird experiences, clanking chains, ghostly sights and gruesome sounds always held me spell-bound and breathless.Experiences in editorial offices taught me that I was not alone in liking stories of mystery. The desire to know something of that existence that is veiled by Death is equally potent in old age and in youth, and men, women and children like to be thrilled to have a creepy feeling along the spinal column as the result of reading of a visitor from beyond the grave.This volume contains the most famous of the weird stories of Edgar Allan Poe, that master of this form of literature. The Black Cat contains all the needed element of mystery and the supernatural, yet the feline acts in a natural manner all of the time, and the story is quite possibly true. It is only in the manner of telling that the tale becomes one that fittingly finds its place in this collection.Guy de Maupassant, the clever Frenchman, is also represented by two effective bits of work, and other less widely known writers have also contributed stories that are worth reading, and when once read will be remembered. There is not a story among the twenty-five that is not worthy of close reading.There has recently been a revival in interest in ghost stories. Many of the high-class magazines have within a few months printed stories with supernatural incidents, and writers whose names are known to all who have read have turned their attention to this form of literature.Whether or not the reader believes in ghosts, he cannot fail to be interested in this little book. Without venturing to express a positive opinion either way, I will only say with Hamlet: There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.-W. Bob Holland